Profile

Prof Philip Hammond

Prof Philip Hammond
Professor


Research group: Sea Mammal Research Unit

Research students (current):

PhD: Gui Bortolotto; Luis Freitas; Tilen Genov; Claire Lacey; Nadya Ramirez; Anna Schleimer

MPhil: Cristel Reyes

Professional Representation:

Member: IUCN Cetacean Specialist Group and Cetacean Red List Authority.

Member: ICES Working Group on Marine Mammal Ecology.

Associate Editor: Marine Mammal Science; Journal of Cetacean Research & Management

source: symbiosis

Research Overview:

Population dynamics and ecology


Foraging behaviour and diet of seals and cetaceans. Estimation of animal abundance. Statistical and mathematical modelling of marine mammal population parameters and processes. Interactions between marine mammals and man: management of whaling, cetacean bycatch in fisheries, seal-fishery interactions; conservation of vulnerable species.

 

12 (of 12 published available) for psh2 with keyword Climate change clear keyword filter. (source: University of St Andrews PURE)
Please click title of any item for full details

Variations in age- and sex-specific survival rates help explain population trend in a discrete marine mammal population Monica Arso Civil, Barbara Cheney, Valentina Islas-Villanueva, Jefferson Alden Graves, Vincent Janik, Paul M Thompson, Philip Steven Hammond
Ecology and Evolution 2019 vol.9 pp.533-544
A new approach to estimate fecundity rate from inter-birth intervals Monica Arso Civil, Barbara Cheney, Paul Thompson, Philip Steven Hammond
Ecosphere 2017 vol.8
Can the camera lie? A non-permanent nick in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Barbara Cheney, Paul M Thompson, Philip Steven Hammond
Aquatic Mammals 2017 vol.43 pp.156-161
Avoidance of wind farms by harbour seals is limited to pile driving activities Debbie JF Russell, Gordon Drummond Hastie, David Thompson, Vincent Janik, Philip Steven Hammond, Lindesay Alexandra Sarah Scott-Hayward, Jason Matthiopoulos, Esther Lane Jones, Bernie J McConnell
Journal of Applied Ecology 2016 vol.53 pp.1642-1652
Echolocation detections and digital video surveys provide reliable estimates of the relative density of harbour porpoises Laura D. Williamson, Kate L. Brookes, Beth E. Scott, Isla M. Graham, Gareth Bradbury, Philip Steven Hammond, Paul M. Thompson
Methods in Ecology and Evolution 2016 vol.7 pp.762-769
Distribution, abundance, and feeding ecology of baleen whales in Icelandic waters: have recent environmental changes had an effect? Gisli A Vikingsson, Daniel G Pike, Héðinn Valdimarsson, Anna Schleimer, Thorvaldur Gunnlaugsson, Teresa Silva, Bjarki Þ Elvarsson, Bjarni Mikkelsen, Nils Øien, Geneviève Desportes, Valur Bogason, Philip Steven Hammond
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 2015 vol.3
Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life Andrew J Wright, LK Blight, R Bruintjes, R Canessa, CW Clark, S Cullis-Suzuki, DT Dakin, C Erbe, Philip Steven Hammond, MD Merchant, PD O'Hara, J Purser, AN Radford, SD Simpson, Len Thomas, MA Wale
Ocean and Coastal Management 2015 vol.115 pp.17-24
Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of activity budgets in sympatric grey and harbour seals Debbie JF Russell, Brett Thomas McClintock, Jason Matthiopoulos, Paul Thompson, David Thompson, Philip Steven Hammond, Esther Lane Jones, Monique MacKenzie, Simon Moss, Bernie J McConnell
Oikos 2015 vol.124 pp.1462-1472
Patterns of space use in sympatric marine colonial predators reveals scales of spatial partitioning Esther Lane Jones, Bernie J McConnell, Sophie Caroline Smout, Philip Steven Hammond, Callan David Duck, Christopher Morris, David Thompson, Debbie JF Russell, cecile vincent, michelle cronin, Ruth Jemma Sharples, jason matthiopoulos
Marine Ecology Progress Series 2015 vol.534 pp.235-249
Long-term trends in the use of a protected area by small cetaceans in relation to changes in population status Barbara Cheney, Ross Corkery, John Durban, Kate Grellier, Philip Steven Hammond, Valentina Islas Villanueva, Vincent Janik, Susan Lusseau, Kim Parsons, Ben Wilson, Paul Thompson
Global Ecology and Conservation 2014 vol.2 pp.118-128
The east coast of Scotland bottlenose dolphin population Monica Arso Civil, Barbara Cheney, Valentina Islas Villanueva, Vincent Janik, Paul Thompson, Philip Steven Hammond
2014
Spatial variation in foraging behaviour of a marine top predator (Phoca vitulina) determined by a large-scale satellite tagging program Ruth Jemma Sharples, Simon E Moss, Toby A Patterson, Philip Steven Hammond
PLoS One 2012 vol.7

Contact Details:

Prof Philip Hammond
Bute Building
University of St Andrews
St Andrews
KY16 9TS
Fife
UK

tel: 01334 463222
fax:
room: B7
email: psh2@st-andrews.ac.uk

Related:

research@st-andrews
Sea Mammal Research Unit
Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modelling
Sea Mammal Research Unit
School of Biology
Scottish Oceans Institute

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