University of St Andrews
 
 
Sea Mammal Research Unit

SMRU News Centre

item 1135
[31-05-2013 to 13-06-2013]


News Item:
Pathogen Genomics and Genetics seminar

Friday 14th June, 2013

Genetics and Genomics of Infectious Diseases Malaria and TB

Lecture theatre - Medical and Biological Sciences Building

One-day seminar - update on new developments in pathogen genomics and genetics, focussing on Malaria and TB.

Pathogen genome research allows exquisite resolution of complete pathogen genetic information that facilitates a global and systematic approach to understanding disease progression. 

Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad application requiring collaboration between groups with diverse expertise.

Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad application requiring collaboration between groups with diverse expertise.

Poster (pdf)

Programme (pdf)

Online Registration Page
Please register by 10th June.  For registration after 10th June contact Janet Cox-Singh:  jcs26@st-andrews.ac.uk

Accommodation (if required)

Venue:

The  seminar will be held in Main Lecture Theatre at the School of Medicine:

School of Medicine
University of St Andrews 
Medical and Biological Sciences Building
North Haugh
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9TF

Scotland

The North Haugh area  is situated to the North West of St Andrews, and is on the right as you approach St Andrews  on the A919/A91 from Leuchars railway station (approx 5 miles)

There is a regular bus service from Leuchars railway station into St Andrews and taxis are available. 

How to Find Us

see here for further details
contact: Dr Janet Cox-Singh


 

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  • Keynote Speech: International Environmental Omics Synthesis Conference
    speaker: Professor Elizabeth A. Thompson (University of Washington, School of Statistics)

    building: MBS
    room: Lecture Theatre
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Prof Thomas Meagher

    More details about the 4-day International Environmental Omics Synthesis Conference in St Andrews, as well as speakers and programme, can be found on the iEOS web site.


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