University of St Andrews
 
 
Sea Mammal Research Unit

SMRU News Centre

item 1135
[31-05-2013 to 13-06-2013]


News Item:
Pathogen Genomics and Genetics seminar

Friday 14th June, 2013

Genetics and Genomics of Infectious Diseases Malaria and TB

Lecture theatre - Medical and Biological Sciences Building

One-day seminar - update on new developments in pathogen genomics and genetics, focussing on Malaria and TB.

Pathogen genome research allows exquisite resolution of complete pathogen genetic information that facilitates a global and systematic approach to understanding disease progression. 

Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad application requiring collaboration between groups with diverse expertise.

Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad application requiring collaboration between groups with diverse expertise.

Poster (pdf)

Programme (pdf)

Online Registration Page
Please register by 10th June.  For registration after 10th June contact Janet Cox-Singh:  jcs26@st-andrews.ac.uk

Accommodation (if required)

Venue:

The  seminar will be held in Main Lecture Theatre at the School of Medicine:

School of Medicine
University of St Andrews 
Medical and Biological Sciences Building
North Haugh
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9TF

Scotland

The North Haugh area  is situated to the North West of St Andrews, and is on the right as you approach St Andrews  on the A919/A91 from Leuchars railway station (approx 5 miles)

There is a regular bus service from Leuchars railway station into St Andrews and taxis are available. 

How to Find Us

see here for further details
contact: Dr Janet Cox-Singh


 

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    The Western Atlantic population of Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) has undergone dramatic declines in recent decades and conservation biologists have sought to improve knowledge about the species’ ecology in an effort to address these declines.  One major information gap has been the lack of good information to describe range and habitat use during the breeding season, when the species is distributed sparsely across the Canadian Arctic. Airborne radio-telemetry surveys and intensive field surveys were conducted across the central Canadian Arctic to locate breeding Red Knots and record characteristics of their nesting habitat. Maximum entropy modeling (MaxEnt) and geographic information system (GIS) data on environmental characteristics were used to predict Red Knot habitat suitability at two spatial scales: of nesting site location suitability at the landscape scale across Southampton Island, and of breeding habitat suitability (i.e., both nesting and foraging habitat) at a broader, regional scale across the central Canadian Arctic. I will examine the relative influence of different environmental characteristics on the predictions of this model of habitat suitability, comment on the bias inherent in such efforts for a sparsely distributed and difficult-to-study species like the Red Knot, and discuss the implications of the results for conservation and future status assessments of other low density shorebird species.


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